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As Their Natural Resources Fail: Native Peoples and the by Frank Tough

By Frank Tough

In traditional histories of the Canadian prairies, local humans disappear from view after the Riel Rebellions. during this groundbreaking learn, Frank tricky examines the function of local peoples, either Indian and Metis, within the economic system of northern Manitoba from Treaty 1 to the melancholy. He argues that they didn't turn into economically out of date yet fairly performed an incredible position within the transitional period among the mercantile fur alternate and the rising business financial system of the mid-twentieth century.

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Extra info for As Their Natural Resources Fail: Native Peoples and the Economic History of Northern Manitoba, 1870-1930

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If not, the furs could be stored at Norway House over the winter. This system allowed some of the trade goods from the Northern Department's depot (York Factory) to be brought inland. ' Freight was situated so that it could be shipped onward shortly after the spring breakup. Using Norway House as a hub facilitated long-distance transport; the Company therefore increased the turnover of capital. The York Factory-Oxford HouseNorway House axis was the most travelled corridor in the whole transportation system.

If not, the furs could be stored at Norway House over the winter. This system allowed some of the trade goods from the Northern Department's depot (York Factory) to be brought inland. ' Freight was situated so that it could be shipped onward shortly after the spring breakup. Using Norway House as a hub facilitated long-distance transport; the Company therefore increased the turnover of capital. The York Factory-Oxford HouseNorway House axis was the most travelled corridor in the whole transportation system.

The Red River boat brigades would pick up the Mackenzie River outfit the next spring and take it on from Norway House to Portage la Loche. At Portage la Loche, Mackenzie River and Red River crews exchanged fur returns for outfits. The fur returns from the northwestern districts were then brought on to Norway House, and favourable conditions meant that the returns would then be taken down to York Factory. If not, the furs could be stored at Norway House over the winter. This system allowed some of the trade goods from the Northern Department's depot (York Factory) to be brought inland.

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