Press "Enter" to skip to content

A Day in the Life of a Dentist by Heather Adamson

By Heather Adamson

This publication follows a dentist during the paintings day, and describes the career and what the task calls for.

Show description

Read or Download A Day in the Life of a Dentist PDF

Similar education & reference books

Division Made Easy

Ebook by means of Wingard-Nelson, Rebecca

Ug As in Bug

Introduces, in short textual content and illustrations, using the letter mixture ''ug'' in such phrases as ''bug,'' ''shrug,'' ''drug,'' and ''lug. ''

California Mathematics: Course One and Course Two: Student Textbook

Ch 1: Ordering and Manipulating Numbers. ch 2: Expressions and Equations. ch three: Fractions and probabilities. ch four: Ratio, percentage and price. ch five: information units. ch 6: likelihood. ch 7: Geometry. extra Questions. Appendixes. 478 pages.

Additional resources for A Day in the Life of a Dentist

Sample text

This tendency can be observed in the time of the Celts and Romans as well as in the last five centuries. In the Middle Ages, English was spoken only in Britain, now it is the principal language of, for example, North America and Australia. The Romance languages are now spoken in the whole of Southern Europe and South America and with these languages came the decimal system. The Chinese also have the decimal system and their civilisation too spread out over a large area. So the spre ad of the decimal system is easy to explain.

This tendency can be observed in the time of the Celts and Romans as well as in the last five centuries. In the Middle Ages, English was spoken only in Britain, now it is the principal language of, for example, North America and Australia. The Romance languages are now spoken in the whole of Southern Europe and South America and with these languages came the decimal system. The Chinese also have the decimal system and their civilisation too spread out over a large area. So the spre ad of the decimal system is easy to explain.

Each day the herdsman would carve a rod, some 15 to 20 em long, which he coloured with red chalk; thus the uncoloured carving would stand out vividly. Then, for every peasant who owned cows in the common herd, an individual symbol was carved on the rod. Below each such symbol one sees an incised line, the individual peasant's 'account', on which the cowherd tallied off the amount of milk yielded by this peasant's cows. The milk was immediately used to make cheese and the sticks were used to settle the accounts between those who had made the cheese and those who owned the cows.

Download PDF sample

Rated 4.34 of 5 – based on 4 votes